Clam choice advice

Nwhite

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#1
Looking to get a clam.

I have a highflow tank. I generally run high Alk about 11 and 500 calcium.

My question is, whats a generally appropriate range for clams are sensitive, or hardy. Ive never had one, my tank does well with sps and lps so im thinking id be ok.

In addition, whats a good solid clam to get thats worth the money?
 
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#2
deresa and squamosa are easier to keep. need low to moderate flow and moderate light. Maxima and Crocea need higher light and low to moderate flow. What’s worth it is completely subjective and up to you. Get ones that you like. They should be supplemented with phytoplankton 2-3 times a week. Don’t get a maxima or crocea that are too small. they should be at least 3”. the small ones are delicate.
 
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#3
Looking to get a clam.

I have a highflow tank. I generally run high Alk about 11 and 500 calcium.

My question is, whats a generally appropriate range for clams are sensitive, or hardy. Ive never had one, my tank does well with sps and lps so im thinking id be ok.

In addition, whats a good solid clam to get thats worth the money?
Know any good places to get one?

Following along also

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Nwhite

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deresa and squamosa are easier to keep. need low to moderate flow and moderate light. Maxima and Crocea need higher light and low to moderate flow. What’s worth it is completely subjective and up to you. Get ones that you like. They should be supplemented with phytoplankton 2-3 times a week. Don’t get a maxima or crocea that are too small. they should be at least 3”. the small ones are delicate.

I like maxima, but lower flow makes me at odds on em forsure. They'll be under hydra 64 hds so light isnt an issue on that front. Okay so 3inch plus and supplement phytoplankton as well awesome! Do they tend to like higher phosphates?
 
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#5
I like maxima, but lower flow makes me at odds on em forsure. They'll be under hydra 64 hds so light isnt an issue on that front. Okay so 3inch plus and supplement phytoplankton as well awesome! Do they tend to like higher phosphates?
Not necessarily higher. Basically natural reef parameters. So there should be low but detectable levels of nitrate and phosphate. here’s a good care article:
Clams
 

Nwhite

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Not necessarily higher. Basically natural reef parameters. So there should be low but detectable levels of nitrate and phosphate. here’s a good care article:
Clams
Awesome.

I just heard of people that used Phosphate RX and it wipped out clams. After they still had detectable numbers.

Thanks for the article!!
 

joseserrano

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They do not do well in higher nutrient environments. Derasa and hippopus are he most forgiving. Phosphate ex is lanthum chloride, which is a specific kind of phosphate removal method, which has is drawbacks, and appropriate way of application. It can harm a lot (including fish) is used inappropriately. Would control nutrient levels prior to adding. You don’t need to add phyto have kept many clams in many tanks for. Years without. Light is more important than supplemental food
 

Nwhite

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They do not do well in higher nutrient environments. Derasa and hippopus are he most forgiving. Phosphate ex is lanthum chloride, which is a specific kind of phosphate removal method, which has is drawbacks, and appropriate way of application. It can harm a lot (including fish) is used inappropriately. Would control nutrient levels prior to adding. You don’t need to add phyto have kept many clams in many tanks for. Years without. Light is more important than supplemental food

Awesome advice, what would you say i start with as a starter. I mean i grow SPS and LPS just fine higer flow higher light.
 

Tangwich

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Nwhite

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Ive seen them in Temecula i believe at fish frenzy, and riptied.

Also petworld in San Bernardino
 

drexel

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If you keep parameters suited for sps, then you can keep a clam. Clams that are aquacultured that are 2" to 3" are completely fine and a good choice. Large wild caught clams over 4" to 5" can be more difficult to keep, but not impossible. Derasa, Hippopus and squamosa are pretty good starters. I think derasa and squamies are easier to come by though. All three get pretty big, so plan on making room. Maxima and crocea need more care (high light is required), but stay smaller. T. noae (aka teardrop) are very cool, but more expensive than others for a basic looking clam, but they're cool. I put their care level up with crocea.
As far as feeding and flow goes, it's true that you don't want high direct flow, primarily to avoid pinning their mantle back, but it's also kind of a myth. Clams will orient themselves in high flow areas that suit them, so don't be overly concerned with flow, they can handle high flow just fine. The only time high flow becomes a problem is when they can't extend their mantles. I've snorkeled in Tahiti and there's no way that we can replicate the amount of flow in our tanks that these clams were experiencing on the reefs, so I wouldn't worry about flow. The other myth that needs to go away is feeding clams. It's true that clams filter feed, but this is not their main source of food, zooxanthellae in their mantles is their food. So strong lighting is key here. Phyto is not required to keep clams and completely unnecessary. The only time that I've seen phyto help is when clams are kept in lower light tanks and supplementing with phyto made up that difference, but even then, phyto can only go so far before the clam(s) suffer and eventually die.
Personally, I would recommend that you slowly lower your alk to more natural levels, but that's just me. We used to keep alk in the 11's and 12's during the 90's, but that's what everyone did back then. I'm old school, so I would recommend a few books (that's right kids, books) to read about clams. Daniel Knop: Giant clams and James Fatherree: Giant clams in the sea and the aquarium. These are great resources (as are a lot of books about the hobby). There are a few places that have clams online that I would recommend, ORA, Pacific East Aquaculture and Clamsmania (never ordered from him, but hear good things). I'm sure there are a number of LFS that have clams, which I always prefer seeing clams in person. All the clams I listed can go in very strong lighting, but only the larger species can thrive in lower light (200+ par). Derasa and squamosa are probably good choices as starters, but as I mentioned, they get big and fast. The key with keeping clams is always checking that there's new growth on the shells, if you don't see that nice, crisp white shell growth, then something is wrong and most likely the clam is starving and will eventually die. Always check for pyramid snails with new clams (or any snails you buy after you get a clam). Brush and clean off their shells and don't be afraid of knocking off a few scutes if you suspect pyramids. Sorry for the long post, but I absolutely love clams (and reefs). Take your time and find a nice clam, but do your homework.
Cheers!
 

Nwhite

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#15
If you keep parameters suited for sps, then you can keep a clam. Clams that are aquacultured that are 2" to 3" are completely fine and a good choice. Large wild caught clams over 4" to 5" can be more difficult to keep, but not impossible. Derasa, Hippopus and squamosa are pretty good starters. I think derasa and squamies are easier to come by though. All three get pretty big, so plan on making room. Maxima and crocea need more care (high light is required), but stay smaller. T. noae (aka teardrop) are very cool, but more expensive than others for a basic looking clam, but they're cool. I put their care level up with crocea.
As far as feeding and flow goes, it's true that you don't want high direct flow, primarily to avoid pinning their mantle back, but it's also kind of a myth. Clams will orient themselves in high flow areas that suit them, so don't be overly concerned with flow, they can handle high flow just fine. The only time high flow becomes a problem is when they can't extend their mantles. I've snorkeled in Tahiti and there's no way that we can replicate the amount of flow in our tanks that these clams were experiencing on the reefs, so I wouldn't worry about flow. The other myth that needs to go away is feeding clams. It's true that clams filter feed, but this is not their main source of food, zooxanthellae in their mantles is their food. So strong lighting is key here. Phyto is not required to keep clams and completely unnecessary. The only time that I've seen phyto help is when clams are kept in lower light tanks and supplementing with phyto made up that difference, but even then, phyto can only go so far before the clam(s) suffer and eventually die.
Personally, I would recommend that you slowly lower your alk to more natural levels, but that's just me. We used to keep alk in the 11's and 12's during the 90's, but that's what everyone did back then. I'm old school, so I would recommend a few books (that's right kids, books) to read about clams. Daniel Knop: Giant clams and James Fatherree: Giant clams in the sea and the aquarium. These are great resources (as are a lot of books about the hobby). There are a few places that have clams online that I would recommend, ORA, Pacific East Aquaculture and Clamsmania (never ordered from him, but hear good things). I'm sure there are a number of LFS that have clams, which I always prefer seeing clams in person. All the clams I listed can go in very strong lighting, but only the larger species can thrive in lower light (200+ par). Derasa and squamosa are probably good choices as starters, but as I mentioned, they get big and fast. The key with keeping clams is always checking that there's new growth on the shells, if you don't see that nice, crisp white shell growth, then something is wrong and most likely the clam is starving and will eventually die. Always check for pyramid snails with new clams (or any snails you buy after you get a clam). Brush and clean off their shells and don't be afraid of knocking off a few scutes if you suspect pyramids. Sorry for the long post, but I absolutely love clams (and reefs). Take your time and find a nice clam, but do your homework.
Cheers!
Oh i really appreciate it.

Ill start reading a little to see what im getting into for sure that seems like some good information to have.

Natural alkalinity Vs high, thats gonna awhile on my part considering I've ran high levels for years. Everything is use to that and to he honest i havent ran my reef under 11 alk 500 cal ever, from the start.

Who knows, maybe she'll fair better lol, maybe not. But par wise i got the lights to get it done. I figure clams in shallow waters are use to some par we cant even produce in a synthetic reef.
 

Nwhite

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#17
If you keep parameters suited for sps, then you can keep a clam. Clams that are aquacultured that are 2" to 3" are completely fine and a good choice. Large wild caught clams over 4" to 5" can be more difficult to keep, but not impossible. Derasa, Hippopus and squamosa are pretty good starters. I think derasa and squamies are easier to come by though. All three get pretty big, so plan on making room. Maxima and crocea need more care (high light is required), but stay smaller. T. noae (aka teardrop) are very cool, but more expensive than others for a basic looking clam, but they're cool. I put their care level up with crocea.
As far as feeding and flow goes, it's true that you don't want high direct flow, primarily to avoid pinning their mantle back, but it's also kind of a myth. Clams will orient themselves in high flow areas that suit them, so don't be overly concerned with flow, they can handle high flow just fine. The only time high flow becomes a problem is when they can't extend their mantles. I've snorkeled in Tahiti and there's no way that we can replicate the amount of flow in our tanks that these clams were experiencing on the reefs, so I wouldn't worry about flow. The other myth that needs to go away is feeding clams. It's true that clams filter feed, but this is not their main source of food, zooxanthellae in their mantles is their food. So strong lighting is key here. Phyto is not required to keep clams and completely unnecessary. The only time that I've seen phyto help is when clams are kept in lower light tanks and supplementing with phyto made up that difference, but even then, phyto can only go so far before the clam(s) suffer and eventually die.
Personally, I would recommend that you slowly lower your alk to more natural levels, but that's just me. We used to keep alk in the 11's and 12's during the 90's, but that's what everyone did back then. I'm old school, so I would recommend a few books (that's right kids, books) to read about clams. Daniel Knop: Giant clams and James Fatherree: Giant clams in the sea and the aquarium. These are great resources (as are a lot of books about the hobby). There are a few places that have clams online that I would recommend, ORA, Pacific East Aquaculture and Clamsmania (never ordered from him, but hear good things). I'm sure there are a number of LFS that have clams, which I always prefer seeing clams in person. All the clams I listed can go in very strong lighting, but only the larger species can thrive in lower light (200+ par). Derasa and squamosa are probably good choices as starters, but as I mentioned, they get big and fast. The key with keeping clams is always checking that there's new growth on the shells, if you don't see that nice, crisp white shell growth, then something is wrong and most likely the clam is starving and will eventually die. Always check for pyramid snails with new clams (or any snails you buy after you get a clam). Brush and clean off their shells and don't be afraid of knocking off a few scutes if you suspect pyramids. Sorry for the long post, but I absolutely love clams (and reefs). Take your time and find a nice clam, but do your homework.
Cheers!

Solid advice 👌 it's been a min on this post but check out my clams
 

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Jimbo327

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#18
Nice clams! I was just thinking about getting another clam for my tank too.

Since I've lost a few SPS frags, I've been bummed about corals. So I already have 2 clams (Derasa and Maxima), and both are doing well...I want to get one last one that is cool looking.

Where did you get your clams? I'm really liking the blue squamosa in Pacific East Aquaculture, but they all the way across the country. I'm a bit worried about shipping. Both my other 2 clams have been local LFS.
 

drexel

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Just make sure you always see new shell growth at the top of the shell, it should always be stark white. For local clams, check out clam mania and stores that carry ORA. Starting with a healthy clam makes all the difference. I would steer clear of wild caught clams altogether, unless you find a noae.


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Jimbo327

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#20
I've talked with John from Clammania twice at CFM, and I always had to pry myself away from his booth because it's like a kid in a candy store. He's got nice clams. I'm not sure if he allows people to go to his facility and pick out the clams. I emailed him to see if that would be a possibility for a visit, and let's see if he responds.

I've had pretty good luck with clams. I did get a wild one from Ali at Amazing Reef, but I trust his judgement. The other one was a Biota derasa that was brought into CFM where I got it. Not too many locals places have a nice selection of ORA clams.
 

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